The magician Samri Baldwin exposed the tricks of the Davenport brothers in his book The Secrets of Mahatma Land Explained (1895).[90] The medium Swami Laura Horos was convicted of fraud several times and was tried for rape and fraud in London in 1901. She was described by the magician Harry Houdini as "one of the most extraordinary fake mediums and mystery swindlers the world has ever known".[91]
Later I talked to a friend about my guilt over participating in this scam when most of my callers would be better served by seeing an actual therapist. “Not necessarily,” she said. “Sometimes you just want someone to give you an answer. Therapists don’t give you an answer. Haven’t you ever been to a psychic?” When I confessed that I have, she said she had, too.
According to the magician John Booth the stage mentalist David Devant managed to fool a number of people into believing he had genuine psychic ability who did not realize that his feats were magic tricks. At St. George's Hall, London he performed a fake "clairvoyant" act where he would read a message sealed inside an envelope. The spiritualist Oliver Lodge who was present in the audience was duped by the trick and claimed that Devant had used psychic powers. In 1936 Devant in his book Secrets of My Magic revealed the trick method he had used.[159]
In the later half of the 20th century, Western mediumship developed in two different ways. One type involved clairaudience or sensitives who hear spirit, and then relay what they hear to their clients.[29] The other incarnation of non-physical mediumship is a form of channeling in which the channeler goes into a trance, or "leaves their body", allowing a spirit entity to borrow their body, who then speaks through them.[30] When in a trance the medium appears to come under the control of the spirit of a departed soul, sometimes entering into a cataleptic state,[31] although modern channelers may not.[citation needed] Some channelers open the eyes when channeling, and remain able to walk and behave normally. The rhythm and the intonation of the voice may also change completely.

^ Brian Righi. (2008). Ghosts, Apparitions and Poltergeists: An Exploration of the Supernatural through History. Llewellyn Publications. Llewellyn Publications. p. 52. ISBN 978-0-7387-1363-2 "One medium of the 1920s, Mina Crandon, became famous for producing ectoplasm during her sittings. At the height of the séance, she was even able to produce a tiny ectoplasmic hand from her navel, which waved about in the darkness. Her career ended when Harvard biologists were able to examine the tiny hand and found it to be nothing more than a carved piece of animal liver."
The psychical researchers Eric Dingwall and Harry Price re-published an anonymous work written by a former medium entitled Revelations of a Spirit Medium (1922) which exposed the tricks of mediumship and the fraudulent methods of producing "spirit hands".[132] Originally all the copies of the book were bought up by spiritualists and deliberately destroyed.[133] In 1923, the magician Carlos María de Heredia revealed how fake spirit hands could be made by using a rubber glove, paraffin and a jar of cold water.[134]
The VERITAS Research Program of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health in the Department of Psychology at the University of Arizona, run by the parapsychologist Gary Schwartz, was created primarily to test the hypothesis that the consciousness (or identity) of a person survives physical death.[186] Schwartz claimed his experiments were indicative of survival, but do not yet provide conclusive proof.[187][188] The experiments described by Schwartz have received criticism from the scientific community for being inadequately designed and using poor controls.[189][190]
In the late 19th century, the fraudulent methods of spirit photographers such as David Duguid and Edward Wyllie were revealed by psychical researchers.[92] Hereward Carrington documented various methods (with diagrams) how the medium would manipulate the plates before, during, and after the séance to produce spirit forms.[93] The ectoplasm materializations of the French medium Eva Carrière were exposed as fraudulent. The fake ectoplasm of Carrière was made of cut-out paper faces from newspapers and magazines on which fold marks could sometimes be seen from the photographs.[94] Cut out faces that she used included Woodrow Wilson, King Ferdinand of Bulgaria, French president Raymond Poincaré and the actress Mona Delza.[95]

I'm using this with a 2018 Mac mini to download pictures from my Sony A7R III SD cards. RAW image downloads really fast, especially if the card is UHS-II. I w I'm using this with a 2018 Mac mini to download pictures from my Sony A7R III SD cards. RAW image downloads really fast, especially if the card is UHS-II. I was able to copy 10 GB from a Sony UHS-II card to my Mac mini's internal SSD in about 40 seconds. On the card reader, there is a little mark to indicate where the top of the SD card is and you can easily tell when the card is inserted all the way. Presumably this works well with all Apple computers with USB-C and the 2018 iPad Pro. I haven't tested the card reader with an iPad Pro. More(Read full review)


In the 1860s and 1870s, trance mediums were very popular. Spiritualism generally attracted female adherents, many who had strong interests in social justice. Many trance mediums delivered passionate speeches on abolitionism, temperance, and women's suffrage.[22] Scholars have described Leonora Piper as one of the most famous trance mediums in the history of Spiritualism.[5][23][24] 
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