Unlike most sites in the industry they offer all clients a money back guarantee if you’re not satisfied for any reason. You won’t get any hassles or any questions. All of the fees are stated clearly so you won’t have any surprises or additional fees. If you talk to someone for 10 minutes at $1 per minute, you’ll pay exactly what they say and that’s $10. It won’t be $10 plus some silly processing fee of $2 or $10 or whatever others set.
We use our intuition all the time without realising it, we may even call it 'a gut feeling' but we have all experienced that sense of 'knowing'. It is us however who decide whether or not to develop our gifts further. Commonly, Psychics will tell you that they were 'guided' by spirit or the universe to follow a spiritual path; this is an innate part of who Psychics are. .
I was 13 when my mom dragged my brother and me to a "psychic." We were visiting family in Malaysia and somewhere amongst a few palm oil plantations was the house of an old woman who claimed to be able to channel Buddha. My mother was enthralled during the hour-long ordeal, during which the woman basically rolled her eyes often so the whites were showing, dropped her voice a few octaves, and made astonishingly mundane statements that could've applied to anyone (examples: our house had ants out front; my grandma was old and having some health problems). Combined with my love of Harry Houdini (who spent the last few years of his life debunking psychics and mediums) and teen angst that made me hate everything my parents liked, the experience left me convinced that psychics were con artists who separated vulnerable and desperate people from their cash in exchange for poor acting.
1. Don’t have a specific agenda. It’s okay to want to know certain things as a result of your psychic session; your psychic will probably allow you to ask questions as well. But if your sole intention for booking a session is to get “the” defining answer to a specific question, you’ll likely end up disappointed. The reason being is that if the psychic is authentic, the information they communicate doesn’t come from them, it comes through them. This means that the psychic has little control over what they are being spiritually guided to convey. You’ll receive what you need, not what you want - which may be two very different things.
Besides reaffirming my belief that I'm a great liar and should do it more, my test also gave me some insight on how psychics work. They're talented when it comes to finding ways squeeze emotions out of you and make general statements that allow you to fill in the blanks yourself—you're contributing to your own deception (example: They say they sense a female presence watching over you, at which point you say, "Oh shit, my aunt/grandma/mom/friend/cousin/sister/teacher died a little while ago—it MUST be her!"). I think so many people turn to psychics because they help ease the fear of the great unknown that is death and give meaning and purpose to seemingly unfair and random events in our chaotic universe. To me, that's a form of preying on the weak and exploiting people at their most emotionally vulnerable, but if you believe in the afterlife and psychic powers, I can understand how the experience would be comforting - after all, who doesn't want to know that a loved family member, living or dead, is doing okay?
A widely known channeler of this variety is J. Z. Knight, who claims to channel the spirit of Ramtha, a 30 thousand-year-old man. Others purport to channel spirits from "future dimensions", ascended masters,[32] or, in the case of the trance mediums of the Brahma Kumaris, God.[33] Other notable channels are Jane Roberts for Seth, Esther Hicks for Abraham,[34] and Carla L. Rueckert for Ra.[35][36]
Some scientists of the period who investigated spiritualism also became converts. They included chemist Robert Hare, physicist William Crookes (1832–1919) and evolutionary biologist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913).[13][14] Nobel laureate Pierre Curie took a very serious scientific interest in the work of medium Eusapia Palladino.[15] Other prominent adherents included journalist and pacifist William T. Stead (1849–1912)[16] and physician and author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930).[17]
×