The British journalist Ruth Brandon published the book The Spiritualists (1983) which exposed the fraud of the Victorian mediums.[5] The book received positive reviews and has been influential to skeptics of spiritualism.[176] The British apport medium Paul McElhoney was exposed as a fraud during a séance in Osset, Yorkshire in 1983. The tape recorder that McElhoney took to his séances was investigated and a black tape was discovered bound around the battery compartment and inside carnation flowers were found as well as a key-ring torch and other objects.[177]
I just wanted to let you know that your readings (tarot of the week) and reflections (from the other newletter, I don’t remember the name!) are always right on. They went through very difficult, and much happier times during these years and reading you has always been such a great support, so soothing, at times confronting, always insigthful. I often share it with my friends, when I see that they are particularly affected by the « energies of the week » and they greatly appreciate it as well!
“I remembered you from way back. You are very caring and you give your craft your 1000 %. You work from the heart and soul. I really appreciate the time we were able to spend together for that reading. ‎It gave me peace of mind. Your line of work is not necessarily easy! But you seem to have a passion for what you do: readings, healings and meditation. One thing is sure, you do have a gift!
Some scientists of the period who investigated spiritualism also became converts. They included chemist Robert Hare, physicist William Crookes (1832–1919) and evolutionary biologist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913).[13][14] Nobel laureate Pierre Curie took a very serious scientific interest in the work of medium Eusapia Palladino.[15] Other prominent adherents included journalist and pacifist William T. Stead (1849–1912)[16] and physician and author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930).[17]
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