^ God's World: A Treatise on Spiritualism Founded on Transcripts of Shorthand Notes Taken Down, Over a Period of Five Years, in the Seance-Room of the William T. Stead Memorial Center (a Religious Body Incorporated Under the Statutes of the State of Illinois), Mrs. Cecil M. Cook, Medium and Pastor. Compiled and Written by Lloyd Kenyon Jones. Chicago, Ill.: The William T. Stead Memorial Center, 1919.
Yes, it was! When I used to work [there], I felt the spirits which were from the old days of the begining of the 19th century. Also, at the end of my shifts, the girls that worked with me would always ask me to read their palms. Considering the amount of energy that is required for palm reading, the Clubhouse was the perfect place for me to do it. I felt that the spirits there would appreciate me, considering the fact that I could feel them. I also felt a good energy. The spirits made me feel that I could make good money when I worked there.
In the late 1920s and early 1930s there were around one quarter of a million practising Spiritualists and some two thousand Spiritualist societies in the UK in addition to flourishing microcultures of platform mediumship and 'home circles'.[18] Spiritualism continues to be practiced, primarily through various denominational spiritualist churches in the United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. In the United Kingdom, over 340 spiritualist churches and centres open their doors to the public and free demonstrations of mediumship are regularly performed.[19]
If you’re reading this because you’re thinking of having a psychic reading and you aren’t sure which way to go, it can seem strange that someone giving a psychic reading over the phone can be as accurate as someone sitting right in front of you.  Especially if you’re a fan of Tarot and thinking, well, hang on.  Don’t I need to shuffle the cards as it’s my reading?
Some scientists of the period who investigated spiritualism also became converts. They included chemist Robert Hare, physicist William Crookes (1832–1919) and evolutionary biologist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913).[13][14] Nobel laureate Pierre Curie took a very serious scientific interest in the work of medium Eusapia Palladino.[15] Other prominent adherents included journalist and pacifist William T. Stead (1849–1912)[16] and physician and author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930).[17]
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