In 1954, the psychical researcher Rudolf Lambert published a report revealing details about a case of fraud that was covered up by many early members of the Institute Metapsychique International (IMI).[163] Lambert who had studied Gustav Geley's files on the medium Eva Carrière discovered photographs depicting fraudulent ectoplasm taken by her companion Juliette Bisson.[163] Various "materializations" were artificially attached to Eva's hair by wires. The discovery was never published by Geley. Eugéne Osty (the director of the institute) and members Jean Meyer, Albert von Schrenck-Notzing and Charles Richet all knew about the fraudulent photographs but were firm believers in mediumship phenomena so demanded the scandal be kept secret.[163]
An experiment conducted by the British Psychological Society in 2005 suggests that under the controlled condition of the experiment, people who claimed to be professional mediums do not demonstrate the mediumistic ability. In the experiment, mediums were assigned to work the participants chosen to be "sitters." The mediums claimed to contact the deceased who were related to the sitters. The research gather the numbers of the statements made and have the sitters rate the accuracy of the statements. The readings that were considered to be somewhat accurate by the sitters were very generalized, and the ones that were considered inaccurate were the ones that were very specific.[193]

Many times, you already know the right thing to do. You just need someone to confirm the truth that is already in your heart. That is where psychic-medium readers can help you. They are a listening and understanding ear, as well as intuitive people who can see beyond the obvious and look to the truths lying beneath the surface that you may be ignoring or trying to hide from yourself.

In 1991, Wendy Grossman in the New Scientist criticized the parapsychologist Stephen E. Braude for ignoring evidence of fraud in mediumship. According to Grossman "[Braude] accuses sceptics of ignoring the evidence he believes is solid, but himself ignores evidence that does not suit him. If a medium was caught cheating on some occasions, he says, the rest of that medium's phenomena were still genuine." Grossman came to the conclusion that Braude did not do proper research on the subject and should study "the art of conjuring."[180]
My first reading was via phone call—the ad said the psychic was offering free mini-readings. She asked for my full name and birthday and Emily's. I gave her the details and almost instantly, she told me Emily wanted me to know that she's in a good place and that she's watching over the family. She also wanted me to be happy too, but my happiness only seems to last temporarily (note: aren't all emotions temporary though?).
In 1960, psychic investigator Andrija Puharich and Tom O'Neill, publisher of the Spiritualist magazine Psychic Observer, arranged to film two seances at Camp Chesterfield, Indiana using infrared film, intending to procure scientific proof of spirit materializations. The medium was shown the camera beforehand, and was aware that she was being filmed. However, the film revealed obvious fraud on the part of the medium and her cabinet assistant. The exposé was published in the 10 July 1960 issue of the Psychic Observer.[168]:96–97
Direct voice communication is the claim that spirits speak independently of the medium, who facilitates the phenomenon rather than produces it. The role of the medium is to make the connection between the physical and spirit worlds. Trumpets are often utilised to amplify the signal, and directed voice mediums are sometimes known as "trumpet mediums". This form of mediumship also permits the medium to participate in the discourse during séances, since the medium's voice is not required by the spirit to communicate. Leslie Flint was one of the best known exponents of this form of mediumship.[28]
Whatever guidance you might be looking for, our gifted and experienced psychic readers are here to talk to you about your future. Our psychic readers are sensitive, honest people who can offer you a warm, sincere welcome and are able to support you through your relationship worries, career concerns, or family issues with their spiritual advice and guidance. Our psychic readers are gifted in clairvoyance, mediumship, past life readings, tarot, astrology and dream interpretations, so you can be sure that you will find the answers you are looking for.
External devices that can read a Personal identification number (PIN) or other information may also be connected to a keyboard (usually called "card readers with PIN pad"). This model works by supplying the integrated circuit on the smart card with electricity and communicating via protocols, thereby enabling the user to read and write to a fixed address on the card.
Wherever you are in New Zealand NZ:  Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, Hamilton, Dunedin, Nelson, Queenstown, Rotorua, Tauranga, Palmerston North, Waikato, Taupo, North Shore, Paraparaumu, Kapiti, Otago, Canterbury, Invercargill, Blenheim, Nemson, Wairarapa, Napier, Whangarei, Taranaki, New Plymouth, Gisborne, Wanganui, Hawkes Bay, Lower Hutt, Hastings, Northland, Cambridge, Coromandel, you can call today on 0800300680 or 090030068 for a reading.
Jean Pierre Allaire was counselling a 13-year old Trois Rivieres girl who reported seeing people that others could not.  He told the girl she should go to the medium to find out whether she has a psychic gift.  He also told her not to tell her psychiatrist about what she was seeing and hearing because that might lead to an increase in the anti-psychotic medications she was taking, which were making her sleepy.  
Some scientists of the period who investigated spiritualism also became converts. They included chemist Robert Hare, physicist William Crookes (1832–1919) and evolutionary biologist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913).[13][14] Nobel laureate Pierre Curie took a very serious scientific interest in the work of medium Eusapia Palladino.[15] Other prominent adherents included journalist and pacifist William T. Stead (1849–1912)[16] and physician and author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930).[17] 
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