It's been about five years since I've taken money for telling someone his or her future. If a friend asks, I'll read their tarot for free because that's really what I think it's worth. I can't tell you dates, I can't see faces; I'm no good at finding lost treasures or interpreting your dreams. I can only ever provide about five to ten minutes of interpretation and the rest of the time is spent fluffing the info, teasing it out of each person to appear larger than it actually is.
In the many years I’ve been a client with them, I’ve never experienced anything negative with their customer service department or their psychics. There are a few that I enjoy talking to regularly because they are good at what they do and they’re dead on with their advice. Look online for Psychic Source reviews. You’ll see I’m not the only one that’s happy to use them.

The Founder, The late VRR Dr. Lewis Bostwick (1918-1995) founded the Church of Divine Man and its seminary workshop the Berkeley Psychic Institute. He was a natural aura reader who saw a rainbow of colors surrounding people and who had a gift of healing. He has taught hundreds of thousands of people how to use their natural clairvoyant abilities to say hello to another spirit and read and heal auras and chakras. Many of his students have moved on to create their own Institute Students have also use the tools taught to incorporate with their own holistic  practice. Clairvoyant readers from all over the world (even a few famous ones) have graduated from the program. All of the Deja Vu Readers are graduates, teachers and former directors.


Ray Hyman discovered many methodological errors with Schwartz's research including; "Inappropriate control comparisons", "Failure to use double-blind procedures", "Creating non-falsifiable outcomes by reinterpreting failures as successes" and "Failure to independently check on facts the sitters endorsed as true". Hyman wrote "Even if the research program were not compromised by these defects, the claims being made would require replication by independent investigators." Hyman criticizes Schwartz's decision to publish his results without gathering "evidence for their hypothesis that would meet generally accepted scientific criteria... they have lost credibility."[191]


In the later half of the 20th century, Western mediumship developed in two different ways. One type involved clairaudience or sensitives who hear spirit, and then relay what they hear to their clients.[29] The other incarnation of non-physical mediumship is a form of channeling in which the channeler goes into a trance, or "leaves their body", allowing a spirit entity to borrow their body, who then speaks through them.[30] When in a trance the medium appears to come under the control of the spirit of a departed soul, sometimes entering into a cataleptic state,[31] although modern channelers may not.[citation needed] Some channelers open the eyes when channeling, and remain able to walk and behave normally. The rhythm and the intonation of the voice may also change completely.

Many 19th century mediums were discovered to be engaged in fraud.[61] While advocates of mediumship claim that their experiences are genuine, the Encyclopædia Britannica article on spiritualism notes in reference to a case in the 19th century that "...one by one, the Spiritualist mediums were discovered to be engaged in fraud, sometimes employing the techniques of stage magicians in their attempts to convince people of their clairvoyant powers." The article also notes that "the exposure of widespread fraud within the spiritualist movement severely damaged its reputation and pushed it to the fringes of society in the United States."[62] 
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