The psychical researchers Eric Dingwall and Harry Price re-published an anonymous work written by a former medium entitled Revelations of a Spirit Medium (1922) which exposed the tricks of mediumship and the fraudulent methods of producing "spirit hands".[132] Originally all the copies of the book were bought up by spiritualists and deliberately destroyed.[133] In 1923, the magician Carlos María de Heredia revealed how fake spirit hands could be made by using a rubber glove, paraffin and a jar of cold water.[134]
Pro-Actively Monitoring: We are watchful of questionable practices at other Networks that have been subjected to media scrutiny. Your experience on our Network will be the best because we hire ONLY the Best Advisors. Our Network operates under the utmost reverence for clients &  advisors. On other networks a new trend has cropped up.  They offer what may seem as an enticing introduction rate.  However they avoid telling you that the rate thereafter will break your wallet! That is kind of shady and we don't work like that.
In 1876, William Eglinton was exposed as a fraud when the psychical researcher Thomas Colley seized a "spirit" materialization in his séance and cut off a portion of its cloak. It was discovered that the cut piece matched a cloth found in Eglinton's suitcase.[79] Colley also pulled the beard off the materialization and it was revealed to be a fake, the same as another one found in the suitcase of Eglinton.[80] In 1880 in a séance a spirit named "Yohlande" materialized, a sitter grabbed it and was revealed to be the medium Mme. d'Esperance herself.[81] 

1. Don’t have a specific agenda. It’s okay to want to know certain things as a result of your psychic session; your psychic will probably allow you to ask questions as well. But if your sole intention for booking a session is to get “the” defining answer to a specific question, you’ll likely end up disappointed. The reason being is that if the psychic is authentic, the information they communicate doesn’t come from them, it comes through them. This means that the psychic has little control over what they are being spiritually guided to convey. You’ll receive what you need, not what you want - which may be two very different things.
So I applied to the phone psychic job, more curious than optimistic about landing the gig. For my first "interview," I received a phone call from an older woman. I was supposed to tell this complete stranger about the life she was currently living and where it would take her. I shuffled my cards while she concentrated, wondering how the hell such a connection could occur over my iPhone. I told her what I'd told my friends and party guests: "Imagine I'm winding a music box. When it feels ready to play, tell me to stop."
Most telephone psychic clients are repeat customers, who rely on their telephone psychic to provide accurate and timely advice that is pertinent to their lives. It is all done over the phone. Phones provide an instant connection between callers and psychics. As a supernatural advisor, it is imperative to build trust and credibility with your clients by using a calming and interested voice and by being able to solve problems and answer questions without ever seeing the person on the other end of the line.

The advantage of using barcode technology is that it is cheap and easy to generate the credential and it can easily be applied to cards or other items. However the same affordability and simplicity makes the technology susceptible to fraud, because fake barcodes can also be created cheaply and easily, for example by photocopying real ones. One attempt to reduce fraud is to print the barcode using carbon-based ink, and then cover the bar code with a dark red overlay. The barcode can then be read with an optical reader tuned to the infrared spectrum, but can not easily be copied by a copy machine. This does not address the ease with which barcode numbers can be generated from a computer using almost any printer.
^ Brian Righi. (2008). Ghosts, Apparitions and Poltergeists: An Exploration of the Supernatural through History. Llewellyn Publications. Llewellyn Publications. p. 52. ISBN 978-0-7387-1363-2 "One medium of the 1920s, Mina Crandon, became famous for producing ectoplasm during her sittings. At the height of the séance, she was even able to produce a tiny ectoplasmic hand from her navel, which waved about in the darkness. Her career ended when Harvard biologists were able to examine the tiny hand and found it to be nothing more than a carved piece of animal liver."

Sandy gave me the main number to call and the four-digit extension I needed in order to get callers routed my way. I followed the prompts and found I’d already been entered into the system as an expert on “love”—they were psychic! I recorded a message for callers in which I explained I was “Natalie” and that I would use tarot to answer all their relationship questions. ESP Net’s online guidance site had a page-and-a-half-long, exceptionally sincere opening we could use on our callers: ” … as soon as I heard your voice I saw the most beautiful aura around you … I felt immediately that you are one of the world’s very special people … This is one of the most exciting readings I’ve done in a long time … I am the one person you needed to talk to, to receive the answers and the help you need in your life at this critical time. …” The true beauty of the introduction was that it would eat up the caller’s three free minutes and get us on our way to meeting the company’s 15-minute-per-call minimum.
Magicians have a long history of exposing the fraudulent methods of mediumship. Early debunkers included Chung Ling Soo, Henry Evans and Julien Proskauer.[59] Later magicians to reveal fraud were Joseph Dunninger, Harry Houdini and Joseph Rinn. Rose Mackenberg, a private investigator who worked with Houdini during the 1920s, was among the most prominent debunkers of psychic fraud during the mid-20th century.[60]
Then I got a call from “Denise,” wanting to know if she is going to get enough money from the insurance company for being rear-ended because she needs the money desperately. I wanted to say, “In that case, hang up the phone!” as well as explain to her that I was an expert on love, not claims adjustment. I laid out the cards anyway. I realized I really didn’t want to give this woman advice, so I hemmed and hawed, and she let her time run out at five minutes.
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