A card reader is a data input device that reads data from a card-shaped storage medium. The first were punched card readers, which read the paper or cardboard punched cards that were used during the first several decades of the computer industry to store information and programs for computer systems. Modern card readers are electronic devices that can read plastic cards embedded with either a barcode, magnetic strip, computer chip or another storage medium.
Memory Card Supported: CompactFlash Type I, CompactFlash Type II, Microdrive, Secure Digital (SD) Card, Secure Digital High Capacity (SDHC), miniSD Card, MultiMediaCard (MMC), MMCplus, Reduced Size MultiMediaCard (RS-MMC), MMCmobile, microSD Card, microSD High Capacity (microSDHC), TransFlash, Memory Stick, Memory Stick Duo, Memory Stick PRO, Memory Stick PRO Duo, Memory Stick Micro (M2)

If you've maxed out the memory on your camera, action cam, or smartphone, then there's a good chance you've invested in a memory card. Just one catch -- your laptop might not have a compatible port to speak with your memory card. That's where a card reader comes in. These handy go-between devices transmit data between a memory card and your computer. Let's answer some common questions about memory card readers.

The difference between the two types of smart cards is the manner with which the microprocessor on the card communicates with the outside world. A contact smart card has eight contact points, which must physically touch the contacts on the reader to convey information between them. Since contact cards must be inserted into readers carefully in the proper orientation, the speed and convenience of such a transaction is not acceptable for most access control applications. The use of contact smart cards as physical access control is limited mostly to parking applications when payment data is stored in card memory, and when the speed of transactions is not as important.

In the 1-to-1 mode a user must first either present an ID card or enter a PIN. The reader then looks up the template of the corresponding user in the database and compares it with the live scan. The 1-to-1 method is considered more secure and is generally faster as the reader needs to perform only one comparison. Most 1-to-1 biometric readers are "dual-technology" readers: they either have a built-in proximity, smart card or keypad reader, or they have an input for connecting an external card reader.