An important feature for memory card readers is the speed with which they can transmit data. Readers with USB 3.0 compatibility will be faster than USB 2.0 technology (as long as your computer has a USB 3.0 port). As mentioned earlier, there are various types of memory cards, so having a reader than can communicate with more than one interface will be beneficial, especially if you find yourself using multiple memory cards.
Magicians have a long history of exposing the fraudulent methods of mediumship. Early debunkers included Chung Ling Soo, Henry Evans and Julien Proskauer.[59] Later magicians to reveal fraud were Joseph Dunninger, Harry Houdini and Joseph Rinn. Rose Mackenberg, a private investigator who worked with Houdini during the 1920s, was among the most prominent debunkers of psychic fraud during the mid-20th century.[60]
In 1991, Wendy Grossman in the New Scientist criticized the parapsychologist Stephen E. Braude for ignoring evidence of fraud in mediumship. According to Grossman "[Braude] accuses sceptics of ignoring the evidence he believes is solid, but himself ignores evidence that does not suit him. If a medium was caught cheating on some occasions, he says, the rest of that medium's phenomena were still genuine." Grossman came to the conclusion that Braude did not do proper research on the subject and should study "the art of conjuring."[180]
A major advantage of live phone readings versus in-person appointments is that there is no chance that the reader can cheat. During a face-to-face session, a reader can gather many clues and insights about a person based on demeanour, clothing, jewellery, hair, make-up, and overall attitude and appearance. The psychic might draw conclusions about someone based on those clues and form the reading around those things.

Most of the callers were terribly lonesome. They didn't want to know their futures as much as they wanted hope. I started the job feeling like a therapist and ended it feeling more like a prostitute. Except instead of sex, there was crying. Instead of revelation, there was blabbering. I was a pay-per-minute substitute for what might actually fill their voids. There was no way I could give them what they needed. I encouraged some to seek therapy or go to church, but HR told me to stop pushing therapy on people who were seeking a psychic. Eventually, we had a mutual termination of my online psychic profile.
A series of mediumistic séances known as the Scole Experiment took place between 1993 and 1998 in the presence of the researchers David Fontana, Arthur Ellison and Montague Keen. This has produced photographs, audio recordings and physical objects which appeared in the dark séance room (known as apports).[185] A criticism of the experiment was that it was flawed because it did not rule out the possibility of fraud. The skeptical investigator Brian Dunning wrote the Scole experiments fail in many ways. The séances were held in the basement of two of the mediums, only total darkness was allowed with no night vision apparatus as it might "frighten the spirits away". The box containing the film was not examined and could easily have been accessible to fraud. And finally, even though many years have passed, there has been no follow-up, no further research by any credible agency or published accounts.[185]
Personally, I think that psychic readings done over the phone are a lot less likely to be influenced by all sorts of information that you can’t help giving away in a face to face reading.  Before you’ve even said a word, whether they mean to or not, a psychic reader can read all sorts of things into your clothes and the way you carry yourself if you’re in front of them.
Some scientists of the period who investigated spiritualism also became converts. They included chemist Robert Hare, physicist William Crookes (1832–1919) and evolutionary biologist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823–1913).[13][14] Nobel laureate Pierre Curie took a very serious scientific interest in the work of medium Eusapia Palladino.[15] Other prominent adherents included journalist and pacifist William T. Stead (1849–1912)[16] and physician and author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930).[17]
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