A common proximity format is 26-bit Wiegand. This format uses a facility code, sometimes also called a site code. The facility code is a unique number common to all of the cards in a particular set. The idea is that an organization will have their own facility code and a set of numbered cards incrementing from 1. Another organization has a different facility code and their card set also increments from 1. Thus different organizations can have card sets with the same card numbers but since the facility codes differ, the cards only work at one organization. This idea worked early in the technology, but as there is no governing body controlling card numbers, different manufacturers can supply cards with identical facility codes and identical card numbers to different organizations. Thus there may be duplicate cards that allow access to multiple facilities in one area. To counteract this problem some manufacturers have created formats beyond 26-bit Wiegand that they control and issue to organizations.
In the 1-to-1 mode a user must first either present an ID card or enter a PIN. The reader then looks up the template of the corresponding user in the database and compares it with the live scan. The 1-to-1 method is considered more secure and is generally faster as the reader needs to perform only one comparison. Most 1-to-1 biometric readers are "dual-technology" readers: they either have a built-in proximity, smart card or keypad reader, or they have an input for connecting an external card reader.
Many Windows users come across the SD card reader not working error after the Windows 10 update and fail to get access to their important SD card data. It's a very nerve-wracking but also common issue that Windows 10 is stuck on the “SD card not recognized” problem. Don’t be worried. In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll walk you through top 4 ways to tackle this card reader not working issue.
Sometimes memories can fade in time, but then we can experience something which brings decade’s old memories flooding back. It could be finding an old photograph, the feel of something in our fingers, the sound of seagulls squawking overhead or the smell from a bakery wafting in the breeze as we are walking along the street. Then, just for a moment, it is as though we are right back in that once-forgotten moment, experiencing the joy and happiness as though reliving it.